Youth In A Jar: What Is So Special About A Beauty Cult Cream?

beauty cult cream

Cult Cream

The word “cult” carries connotations of a loyal devout following and in the world of beauty, this certainly holds true.

Having names like Creme dela Mer, Sensai, La Creme, Sisleya, Creme Cellulaire Radiance – all sound as exotic as they are unfamiliar. Chances are, you’ve probably never heard of them, unless you’re in the know.

In the past few years, cult brands from beauty emporiums such as Beauty Bar and Essenses have been cropping up on shelves, and despite the lack of aggressive advertising for other mass-market brands, they have not gone unnoticed.

Instead of traditional marketing campaigns, they gain popularity through word of mouth, and through magazine and celebrity endorsements.

New users grab those obscure creams and are quickly inducted into the “cult.”  If old department store brands used to be the must-haves in your kit, these days, prestige is not as much of a cachet as exclusivity.  For many style-setters, the more obscure and difficult to find, the better.

This explains why some big-time customers buy several jars of these creams at a time, and even with their steep prices, they are always out of stock.

Why the fuss?

Stopping the aging process or at least slowing it to a crawl is the preoccupation of an ever-growing market.  Apart from the obvious line and jowls that accompany the passage of time, the reason for the popularity of those products is the buzz generated by every new entry.

What’s in it?  

Who uses it?

Fans of Creme dela Mer, a sea-kelp-rich cream, say it moisturizes dry skin like nothing else, while Sisleya and La Prairie potions are staples for the country’s most beautiful women

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It takes more than persuasive claims to give an anti-aging cream this kind of cachet, however.  Most of them justify their price tag with rare ingredients, but some also have unfounded claims.

More than that, the consumer has to be vigilant, not only if the miracle cream fails to perform as manufacturers claim, but if they produce results that are no different from that of the less-expensive brand.  While some marketing campaigns can be misleading, the industry has also developed effective products that are well worth your money.  Bottom line is, if it’s too good to be true, it probably is.

By sticking to  a simple regimen and having a healthy dose of skepticism, you’ll be able to cut through the hype ad find what you need to look and feel good, without getting caught in the cult cream craze.

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5 Comments

  1. You know what sis, I did not start using products for my skin until I hit the 40 mark last year hahaha, na conscious eh lol. I am corrently uising an anti aging cream that I reviewed and so far di ko pa makita improvement lol

  2. I used to use La Prairie but I'm cutting back now on splurges. Although, La Prairie does make my skin so supple. I found another alternative, still pricey but it lasts longer that the other expensive brands – BIO OIL 🙂 Makes my skin feel so soft and like a baby's bottom. Hahahaha…Seriously, my friends keep saying what I put on my face, aside from drinking lots of water and eating plenty of fresh fruits, I just use Bio oil in the morning and at night, after washing my face with water. It's around $30 for a big bottle. Forgot how many ml. But try it if you find one there in the Philippines.

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